A dovetail joint of news, art, science, politics, philosophy & global affairs

Grasping the currency true to our time

"Πάντα ῥεῖ καὶ οὐδὲν μένει"







June 8th
9:38 PM
Via

killanythingthatmoves:

“Among the most poignant of the interviews I conducted was with Jamie Henry, a former army medic with whom I eventually forged a friendship… While many others had kept silent, Henry stepped forward and reported the crimes he’d seen, taking significant risks for what he believed was right. He talked to the U.S. Army Criminal Investigation Command, he wrote a detailed article, he spoke out in public again and again. But the army left him to twist in the wind, a lone voice repeatedly recounting apparently uncorroborated tales of shocking violence, while most Americans paid little attention. Until I sought him out and showed him the documents I’d found, Henry had no idea that in the early 1970s military investigators had in fact tracked down and interviewed his fellow unit members, proving his allegations beyond any doubt— and that the army had then hidden away this information, never telling him or anyone else. When he looked over my stacks of photocopies, he was astounded.”

Nick Turse, Kill Anything That Moves: The Real American War in Vietnam

February 2nd
2:04 AM
Via
zeitvox:

airyhippie:

“The new consciousness is developing which sees the Earth as a single organism, and recognizes that an organism at war with itself is doomed.”— Carl Sagan

An older consciousness realizes that this very consciousness is a form of war. It opposes and seeks a transform of what it sees as a stale paradigm. It can’t help but say, between the lines, what we already know: An organism not at war with itself is doomed. 
Justice is an art of war, most genuinely showing itself in an organism’s fight against itself - the surest sign of autonomy. And if mankind does or does not escape an earthbound fate, either way it will come to pass through acts of war.

“The way up and the way down are one and the same”
“War is the father of all things”
— Heraclitus

zeitvox:

airyhippie:

“The new consciousness is developing which sees the Earth as a single organism, and recognizes that an organism at war with itself is doomed.”

— Carl Sagan

An older consciousness realizes that this very consciousness is a form of war. It opposes and seeks a transform of what it sees as a stale paradigm. It can’t help but say, between the lines, what we already know: An organism not at war with itself is doomed. 

Justice is an art of war, most genuinely showing itself in an organism’s fight against itself - the surest sign of autonomy. And if mankind does or does not escape an earthbound fate, either way it will come to pass through acts of war.

“The way up and the way down are one and the same”

“War is the father of all things”

— Heraclitus

May 10th
12:22 PM

The Energy Wars Heat Up

Michael T. Klare »

…what we are now seeing is a whole cluster of oil-related clashes stretching across the globe, involving a dozen or so countries, with more popping up all the time.  Consider these flash-points as signals that we are entering an era of intensified conflict over energy.

From the Atlantic to the Pacific, Argentina to the Philippines, here are the six areas of conflict — all tied to energy supplies — that have made news in just the first few months of 2012:

  • A brewing war between Sudan and South Sudan
  • Naval clash in the South China Sea
  • Egypt cuts off the natural gas flow to Israel
  • Argentina seizes YPF
  • Argentina re-ignites the Falklands crisis
  • U.S. forces mobilize for war with Iran

…The world has long been bifurcated between energy-surplus and energy-deficit states, with the former deriving enormous political and economic advantages from their privileged condition and the latter struggling mightily to escape their subordinate position.  Now, that bifurcation is looking more like a chasm.  In such a global environment, friction and conflict over oil and gas reserves — leading to energy conflicts of all sorts — is only likely to increase.  >continue<

Each of the bullet points are expanded in detail. Related entries on the South China Sea and the renewal of the Falklands/Malivinas dispute.

March 25th
12:04 PM
Via
thepoliticalnotebook:

This Week in War. A Friday round-up of what happened and what’s been written in the world of war and military/security affairs this week. It’s a mix of news reports, policy briefs, blog posts and longform journalism.
News this morning: Asma Al-Assad will be hit with EU sanctioning.
The female members of Afghanistan’s High Peace Council say they are being sidelined.
A two-part assessment of the past few months of the Afghan transitional process from the Afghan Analysts Network. (1, 2)
There were two notable longreads pieces this week on Afghanistan, the massacre and the future of US involvement. One, by Neil Shea in The American Scholar, examines how his experiences on embed with US soldiers give insight into how the massacre happened. The other, by Matt Gallagher in the Boston Review, focuses on soldiers looking to the post-massacre political and military future.
Here are the names of the sixteen victims of the massacre.
I made a vision board for the Afghan war on Pinterest.
Ahmed Rashid was interviewed about crisis and politics in Pakistan for NPR Fresh Air.
An article on the powerful part women have played in the Libyan revolution in the Smithsonian.
Brookings’ Saban Center has released a report that estimates the various costs of a Syrian intervention in order to be “executed properly.”
This week marked the nine-year anniversary since the US dropped bombs over Baghdad during the now-infamous shock and awe. CNAS fellow Dr. Colin Kahl testified this week before the House Foreign Affairs Committee on the deteriorating situation in Iraq. 
The Khawajas, a prominent revolutionary family, are under siege by the government of Bahrain.
Some really cool crisis-mapping work: mapping the mainstream media coverage of election violence in Kenya in comparison with citizen journalist coverage.
The International Crisis Group has warned that militarized post-war policies in Sri Lanka could re-ignite violence.
Soldiers overthrew President Touré in a successful military coup in the West African country of Mali, previously considered a quality example of African democratic leadership.
A really fabulous look at some climate security policy dilemmas over at Duck of Minerva.
NPR’s Morning Edition looks at cybersecurity legislation.
The US is boosting its cyberweapons and cyberdefense research: $500m has gone to DARPA over the past 5 years for this purpose.
A nuclear security summit is set to start in Seoul on Monday.
Sebastian Junger has begun an organizaton called Reporters Instructed in Saving Colleagues that provides freelance journalists with three-day training sessions in emergency medical skills. 
The Stockholm International Peace Research Institute has updated its information on international arms transfers. Here’s a fact sheet assessing the trends and data from the 2007-11 period.
Four female veterans are running for Congress this year! 
According to the GAO, the Army has serious problems with its payroll system that are causing serious delays in paychecks and could prevent the Army from being audit-ready.
Katy Perry pretended to be a Marine in her latest music video and I don’t so much know how I feel about this. Come to your own conclusions.
Photo: A Black Hawk takes off after unloading a team of Pathfinders and an Afghan patrol in Kandahar. US Army Flickr Stream.

thepoliticalnotebook:

This Week in War. A Friday round-up of what happened and what’s been written in the world of war and military/security affairs this week. It’s a mix of news reports, policy briefs, blog posts and longform journalism.

Photo: A Black Hawk takes off after unloading a team of Pathfinders and an Afghan patrol in Kandahar. US Army Flickr Stream.

August 27th
12:20 PM
Via
airyhippie:

“The new consciousness is developing which sees the Earth as a single organism, and recognizes that an organism at war with itself is doomed.”— Carl Sagan

An older consciousness realizes that this very consciousness is a form of war. It opposes and seeks a transform of what it sees as a stale paradigm. It can&#8217;t help but say, between the lines, what we already know: An organism not at war with itself is doomed. 
Justice is an art of war, most genuinely showing itself in an organism&#8217;s fight against itself - the surest sign of autonomy. And if mankind does or does not escape an earthbound fate, either way it will come to pass through acts of war.

"The way up and the way down are one and the same"
"War is the father of all things"
— Heraclitus

airyhippie:

“The new consciousness is developing which sees the Earth as a single organism, and recognizes that an organism at war with itself is doomed.”

— Carl Sagan

An older consciousness realizes that this very consciousness is a form of war. It opposes and seeks a transform of what it sees as a stale paradigm. It can’t help but say, between the lines, what we already know: An organism not at war with itself is doomed. 

Justice is an art of war, most genuinely showing itself in an organism’s fight against itself - the surest sign of autonomy. And if mankind does or does not escape an earthbound fate, either way it will come to pass through acts of war.

"The way up and the way down are one and the same"

"War is the father of all things"

— Heraclitus

August 24th
12:16 PM
Via

The Vietnam Syndrome

tetw:

by Christopher Hitchens

To be writing these words is, for me, to undergo the severest test of my core belief - that sentences can be more powerful than pictures. A writer can hope to do what a photographer cannot: convey how things smelled and sounded as well as how things looked. I seriously doubt my ability to perform this task on this occasion. Unless you see the landscape of ecocide, or meet the eyes of its victims, you will quite simply have no idea. >continue<

July 23rd
1:30 PM
Via

What We've Learned, If Anything

In the wake of 1989, with boundless confidence and insufficient reflection, we put the twentieth century behind us and strode boldly into its successor swaddled in self-serving half-truths: the triumph of the West, the end of History, the unipolar American moment, the ineluctable march of globalization and the free market.

The belief that that was then and this is now embraced much more than just the defunct dogmas andinstitutions of cold war–era communism. During the Nineties, and again in the wake of September 11, 2001, I was struck more than once by a perverse contemporary insistence on not understanding the context of our present dilemmas, at home and abroad; on not listening with greater care to some of the wiser heads of earlier decades; on seeking actively to forget rather than remember, to deny continuity and proclaim novelty on every possible occasion. We have become stridently insistent that the past has little of interest to teach us. Ours, we assert, is a new world; its risks and opportunities are without precedent. >continue<

An excellent long read, originally blogged by tetw. Even if we see the 21st century as posing novel challenges to any meaningful ideological comportment, and even a warrant for novelty, the task cannot be executed without tarrying and immersing ourselves in an honest appreciation of history.