A dovetail joint of news, art, science, politics, philosophy & global affairs

Grasping the currency true to our time

"Πάντα ῥεῖ καὶ οὐδὲν μένει"







December 3rd
7:33 AM
Via

"What is the most astounding fact… a mote of dust suspended in a sunbeam"

October 28th
4:00 PM
Via
pappubahry:

Earth, photographed by MESSENGER after its flyby.
This gif uses only the photos taken through the blue(-ish) filter; the folks at NASA/Johns Hopkins/Carnegie Institution of Washington have properly colourised the movie here.

pappubahry:

Earth, photographed by MESSENGER after its flyby.

This gif uses only the photos taken through the blue(-ish) filter; the folks at NASA/Johns Hopkins/Carnegie Institution of Washington have properly colourised the movie here.

September 3rd
11:52 PM
Via
ikenbot:

Ancient Orbs
This sparkling picture taken by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope shows the centre of globular cluster M 4. The power of Hubble has resolved the cluster into a multitude of glowing orbs, each a colossal nuclear furnace.
M 4 is relatively close to us, lying 7200 light-years distant, making it a prime object for study. It contains several tens of thousand stars and is noteworthy in being home to many white dwarfs — the cores of ancient, dying stars whose outer layers have drifted away into space.

ikenbot:

Ancient Orbs

This sparkling picture taken by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope shows the centre of globular cluster M 4. The power of Hubble has resolved the cluster into a multitude of glowing orbs, each a colossal nuclear furnace.

M 4 is relatively close to us, lying 7200 light-years distant, making it a prime object for study. It contains several tens of thousand stars and is noteworthy in being home to many white dwarfs — the cores of ancient, dying stars whose outer layers have drifted away into space.

August 25th
3:38 PM
zeitvox:

Neil Armstrong comments on the final landing sequence. View from the Eagle in 1969 on the left and a Google lunar map on the right - from a video recreation.
A glitch had put the Apollo 11 lunar module in a higher altitude than anticipated on approach. Dangerously low on fuel, Armstrong takes manual control in order to avoid massive boulders, and finds a good spot with less than 30 seconds of fuel remaining. Though reclusive and rarely interviewed, the right stuff gives a rare account to - well - Australian accountants.

Neil Armstrong, dead at 82

zeitvox:

Neil Armstrong comments on the final landing sequence. View from the Eagle in 1969 on the left and a Google lunar map on the right - from a video recreation.

A glitch had put the Apollo 11 lunar module in a higher altitude than anticipated on approach. Dangerously low on fuel, Armstrong takes manual control in order to avoid massive boulders, and finds a good spot with less than 30 seconds of fuel remaining. Though reclusive and rarely interviewed, the right stuff gives a rare account to - well - Australian accountants.

Neil Armstrong, dead at 82

August 6th
6:53 AM
Via

Curiosity Down Successfully at Gale Crater

typogodess:

The first 3 photos from Curiosity, the first one is it’s shadow on Mars

June 25th
2:42 PM

Mars: August 5th 2012,
Curiosity’s 7 Minutes of Hell

It’s the size of a car. Apparently this nixes the balloon bouncy approach used with Spirit and Opportunity. Good luck Curiosity; Mars is getting bigger every day now.

June 23rd
4:21 PM
Via

Earth, Jupiter and Venus from the skyline of Mars!

Earth, Jupiter and Venus from the skyline of Mars!

May 29th
8:25 AM
NASA asks future Moon visitors to respect its stuffAdam Mann - arstechnica »

…China, India, and Japan, are looking to put unmanned probes on the lunar surface. But more unprecedented are the 26 teams currently racing to win the Google Lunar X Prize—a contest that will award $20 million to the first private company to land a robot on the lunar surface…
NASA is asking anyone that makes it to the lunar surface to keep their landing at least 1.2 miles away from any Apollo site and about 1,600 feet from the five Ranger impact sites. The distance should keep the old equipment safe from a terrible accident or collision. It will also would put the new equipment “over the lunar horizon” relative to the relics, and prevent any moon dust—known to be a highly abrasive material—from sandblasting NASA’s old machines.
The Apollo 11 and 17 sites—the first and last places visited by man—are singled out in particular for extra care and respect. Robots are prohibited from visiting both sites and are requested to remain outside a large radius (250 feet for Apollo 11 and 740 feet for Apollo 17) to prevent a stray rover from accidentally harming hardware or erasing any footprints.
"Only one misstep could forever damage this priceless human treasure" … >continue<

Not bad, at least when you don’t have a lunar presence to bolster your enforcement profile.

NASA asks future Moon visitors to respect its stuff
Adam Mann - arstechnica »

…China, India, and Japan, are looking to put unmanned probes on the lunar surface. But more unprecedented are the 26 teams currently racing to win the Google Lunar X Prize—a contest that will award $20 million to the first private company to land a robot on the lunar surface…

NASA is asking anyone that makes it to the lunar surface to keep their landing at least 1.2 miles away from any Apollo site and about 1,600 feet from the five Ranger impact sites. The distance should keep the old equipment safe from a terrible accident or collision. It will also would put the new equipment “over the lunar horizon” relative to the relics, and prevent any moon dust—known to be a highly abrasive material—from sandblasting NASA’s old machines.

The Apollo 11 and 17 sites—the first and last places visited by man—are singled out in particular for extra care and respect. Robots are prohibited from visiting both sites and are requested to remain outside a large radius (250 feet for Apollo 11 and 740 feet for Apollo 17) to prevent a stray rover from accidentally harming hardware or erasing any footprints.

"Only one misstep could forever damage this priceless human treasure" … >continue<

Not bad, at least when you don’t have a lunar presence to bolster your enforcement profile.

8:48 AM
Via
carlzimmer:

Compared to Jupiter’s moon Europa, our planet is practically a desert, as this NASA image shows. It’s a computer visualization showing Europa and a dried-out Earth, with the volume of all their water represented by blue spheres.
(Details at APOD: 2012 May 24 - All the Water on Europa)

carlzimmer:

Compared to Jupiter’s moon Europa, our planet is practically a desert, as this NASA image shows. It’s a computer visualization showing Europa and a dried-out Earth, with the volume of all their water represented by blue spheres.

(Details at APOD: 2012 May 24 - All the Water on Europa)

May 24th
12:35 PM
Neil Armstrong comments on the final landing sequence. View from the Eagle in 1969 on the left and a Google lunar map on the right - from a video recreation.
A glitch had put the Apollo 11 lunar module in a higher altitude than anticipated on approach. Dangerously low on fuel, Armstrong takes manual control in order to avoid massive boulders, and finds a good spot with less than 30 seconds of fuel remaining. Though reclusive and rarely interviewed, the right stuff gives a rare account to - well - Australian accountants.

Neil Armstrong comments on the final landing sequence. View from the Eagle in 1969 on the left and a Google lunar map on the right - from a video recreation.

A glitch had put the Apollo 11 lunar module in a higher altitude than anticipated on approach. Dangerously low on fuel, Armstrong takes manual control in order to avoid massive boulders, and finds a good spot with less than 30 seconds of fuel remaining. Though reclusive and rarely interviewed, the right stuff gives a rare account to - well - Australian accountants.

May 10th
8:46 AM
Via
lookingforether:

Above is an image of the constellation Orion, which is also the home to a ferocious red giant known as Betelgeuse. It is clearly visible as a bright point of fiery orange light. By analyzing its brightness, astrophysicists have uncovered that it’s extremely unstable and has dimmed by 15% in the past decade. At about ten million years old, It is a relatively young star but has sped through its life cycle as a result of its extraordinary mass.  
At this very moment, there are hundreds of telescopes from around the world trained on this relatively nearby star, following its every move. This is because Betelgeuse is about to explode any time soon. And by “any time soon”, I mean it could burst into a fiery supernova either tomorrow or in a million years. Although we are quite uncertain about when exactly it will burst apart, we do know that when it does go, it will provide us with a spectacular stellar show. With the red giant being a mere 500 light years away, the explosion will be so incredibly bright that it may shine as bright as a full moon at night and fill the sky as a miniature second sun. Or maybe it has exploded as i write this blog-post but the light simply hasn’t reach us yet. 
In a blink of an eye, Betelgeuse will release more energy that our sun has or ever will produce in its lifetime and if we’re lucky enough, we’ll get to witness it with our own eyes. 

lookingforether:

Above is an image of the constellation Orion, which is also the home to a ferocious red giant known as Betelgeuse. It is clearly visible as a bright point of fiery orange light. By analyzing its brightness, astrophysicists have uncovered that it’s extremely unstable and has dimmed by 15% in the past decade. At about ten million years old, It is a relatively young star but has sped through its life cycle as a result of its extraordinary mass.  

At this very moment, there are hundreds of telescopes from around the world trained on this relatively nearby star, following its every move. This is because Betelgeuse is about to explode any time soon. And by “any time soon”, I mean it could burst into a fiery supernova either tomorrow or in a million years. Although we are quite uncertain about when exactly it will burst apart, we do know that when it does go, it will provide us with a spectacular stellar show. With the red giant being a mere 500 light years away, the explosion will be so incredibly bright that it may shine as bright as a full moon at night and fill the sky as a miniature second sun. Or maybe it has exploded as i write this blog-post but the light simply hasn’t reach us yet. 

In a blink of an eye, Betelgeuse will release more energy that our sun has or ever will produce in its lifetime and if we’re lucky enough, we’ll get to witness it with our own eyes. 

May 7th
6:09 PM
"I’m convinced that 2001 is really a movie about getting something good to eat. Monolith appears to apes: Apes get tasty meat. All the humans in space? They’re eating processed crap (even the restaurant on the orbital is a “Howard Johnson’s”) Then Dave goes through the monolith. Just before he evolves into space baby, he’s shown eating a real, prepared meal, with knife and fork.

The monolith creators are just interested in making sure we eat well"
12:50 PM
Via

unknownskywalker:

The View From Freedom 7 - First American in Space

Photos from the Mercury-Redstone suborbital rocket launch on May 5, 1961 that took Alan B. Shepard, Jr. into space aboard Freedom 7. The photos, taken by a film camera mounted to the capsule, were compiled into a video by Arizona State University.

May 3rd
12:41 PM
Via
thenewenlightenmentage:

Mars-Bound Rover in Home Stretch of Red Planet Voyage
NASA’s newest Mars rover is entering the final leg of its space cruise, with just over three months remaining until it touches down on the Red Planet.
The huge Curiosity rover launched in November and is slated to land at Mars’ Gale Crater on the night of Aug. 5. Curiosity’s mission team is working hard to prepare for the impending arrival, practicing the rover’s unconventional landing and mapping out just what it will do on the Red Planet’s surface.
Continue Reading

thenewenlightenmentage:

Mars-Bound Rover in Home Stretch of Red Planet Voyage

NASA’s newest Mars rover is entering the final leg of its space cruise, with just over three months remaining until it touches down on the Red Planet.

The huge Curiosity rover launched in November and is slated to land at Mars’ Gale Crater on the night of Aug. 5. Curiosity’s mission team is working hard to prepare for the impending arrival, practicing the rover’s unconventional landing and mapping out just what it will do on the Red Planet’s surface.

Continue Reading