A dovetail joint of news, art, science, politics, philosophy & global affairs

Grasping the currency true to our time

"Πάντα ῥεῖ καὶ οὐδὲν μένει"










February 27th
4:22 PM
With eviction all but certain, Occupy Nashville braces for the future : Jonathan Meador »

Now only a third of Occupy Nashville’s plaza presence remains, down from 60 tents at the camp’s apex. On Tuesday morning, a handful of Occupiers stroll the quiet plaza grounds, while the inhabitants of the roughly 22 tents scattered across the plaza remain inside them, sleeping or starting the occasional anti-bank-bailout chant as passers-by, mostly state employees, amble to and from the Capitol.
The camp’s lending library, food service station, media tent and other ad hoc accoutrements are long gone. So are most of the protesters who joined the camp last fall following two nights of highly publicized arrests ordered by Gov. Bill Haslam, which netted the arrests of 50 people — your humble correspondent being one of them — on charges that were eventually dropped. >continue<

Artist hangs with Occupy Nashville (video)  |  Senate votes to remove
photo: Eric England

With eviction all but certain, Occupy Nashville braces for the future : Jonathan Meador »

Now only a third of Occupy Nashville’s plaza presence remains, down from 60 tents at the camp’s apex. On Tuesday morning, a handful of Occupiers stroll the quiet plaza grounds, while the inhabitants of the roughly 22 tents scattered across the plaza remain inside them, sleeping or starting the occasional anti-bank-bailout chant as passers-by, mostly state employees, amble to and from the Capitol.

The camp’s lending library, food service station, media tent and other ad hoc accoutrements are long gone. So are most of the protesters who joined the camp last fall following two nights of highly publicized arrests ordered by Gov. Bill Haslam, which netted the arrests of 50 people — your humble correspondent being one of them — on charges that were eventually dropped. >continue<

Artist hangs with Occupy Nashville (video)  |  Senate votes to remove

photo: Eric England

January 24th
7:56 PM

Soros: situations 'serious and difficult'

Occupy Wall Street “is an inchoate, leaderless manifestation of protest,” but it will grow. It has “put on the agenda issues that the institutional left has failed to put on the agenda for a quarter of a century.” He reaches for analysis, produced by the political blog ThinkProgress.org, that shows how the Occupy movement has pushed issues of unemployment up the agenda of major news organizations, including MSNBC, CNN, and Fox News. It reveals that in one week in July of last year the word “debt” was mentioned more than 7,000 times on major U.S. TV news networks. By October, mentions of the word “debt” had dropped to 398 over the course of a week, while “occupy” was mentioned 1,278 times, “Wall Street” 2,378 times, and “jobs” 2,738 times. You can’t keep a financier away from his metric.  >continue<

January 17th
5:44 PM
Via
hellsunicorn:

expect us.

hellsunicorn:

expect us.

January 4th
5:02 PM

#Riot: Self-Organized, Hyper-Networked Revolts—Coming to a City Near You

Wired.com | Bill Wasik »

For tech to become effective as a tool for civic disorder, it first had to insinuate itself into people’s daily lives. Now that it has, there can be no getting rid of it. The agent provocateur lives inside our pockets and purses and cannot be uninstalled.  >continue<

Interesting long read & observations on protests, technology and social media.  Wild too trying to get a fix on the irony of blanket attitudes of opposition to a system which in large part are enabled and sustained by what is undeniably a product of the system.

December 26th
10:43 AM
Via
&#8230; und nicht anders.

… und nicht anders.

10:26 AM
Via
"Democracy in both America and Britain is coming under scrutiny these days. Quite apart from the antics of MPs and congressmen, it is said to be sliding towards oligarchy, with increasing overtones of autocracy. Money and its power over technology are making elections unfair. The military-industrial complex is as powerful as ever, having adopted “the menace of global terrorism” as its casus belli. Lobbying and corruption are polluting the government process. In a nutshell, democracy is not in good shape.How strange to choose this moment to export it, least of all to countries that have never experienced it in their history. The West not only exports the stuff, it does so with massive, thuggish violence, the antithesis of how self-government should mature in any polity. The tortured justification in Iraq and Afghanistan is that elections will somehow sanctify a “war against terrorism” waged on someone else’s soil. The resulting death and destruction have been appalling. Never can an end, however noble, have so failed to justify the means of achieving it. (via toobaa)"
—  Simon Jenkins, former editor of The Times, writing in The Guardian newspaper, 8 April 2010  … with a prescience for things occupy.
December 13th
2:32 PM

Moyers: Why 'We The People' Must Triumph Over Corporate Power

"Against such odds, discouragement comes easily. But if the generations before us had given up, slaves would be waiting on our tables and picking our crops, women would be turned back at the voting booths, and it would be a crime for workers to organize. Like our forebears, we will not fix the broken promise of America — the promise of “life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness” for all our citizens, not just the powerful and privileged — if we throw in the proverbial towel. Surrendering to plutocracy is not an option. Confronting a moment in our history that is much like the one Lincoln faced — when “we can nobly save or meanly lose the last best hope on earth” — we must fight back against the forces that are pouring dirty money into the political system, turning it into a sewer."

- Bill Moyers

December 10th
7:36 PM
Via
"…and the public is standing there, amazed, because we just bailed you out how can you be paying yourself billions of dollars of bonuses again? And the bankers say, ‘well we deserve it, what’s your problem’? And the problem that the Occupy Wall Street and other protesters have is: you don’t deserve it, you nearly broke the system, you gamed the economy, you’re paying mega fines, yet you’re still in the White House you’re going to the state dinners, you’re paying yourself huge bonuses, what kind of system is this?
When I talk about this in the United States, I’m often attacked, ‘oh, you don’t believe in the free market economy’, I say, how much free market can there be? You say deregulate, the moment the banks get in trouble, you say bail them out, the moment you bail them out, you say go back to deregulation. That’s not a free market, that’s a game, and we have to get out of the game. We have to get back to grown-up behaviour."
November 29th
5:09 PM
Via

The New Progressive Movement | Jeffrey D. Sachs

theamericanbear:

OCCUPY WALL STREET and its allied movements around the country are more than a walk in the park. They are most likely the start of a new era in America. Historians have noted that American politics moves in long swings. We are at the end of the 30-year Reagan era, a period that has culminated in soaring income for the top 1 percent and crushing unemployment or income stagnation for much of the rest. The overarching challenge of the coming years is to restore prosperity and power for the 99 percent.

Thirty years ago, a newly elected Ronald Reagan made a fateful judgment: “Government is not the solution to our problem. Government is the problem.” Taxes for the rich were slashed, as were outlays on public services and investments as a share of national income. Only the military and a few big transfer programs like Social Security, Medicare, Medicaid and veterans’ benefits were exempted from the squeeze.

Reagan’s was a fateful misdiagnosis. He completely overlooked the real issue — the rise of global competition in the information age — and fought a bogeyman, the government. Decades on, America pays the price of that misdiagnosis, with a nation singularly unprepared to face the global economic, energy and environmental challenges of our time.

Washington still channels Reaganomics. The federal budget for nonsecurity discretionary outlays — categories like highways and rail, education, job training, research and development, the judiciary, NASA, environmental protection, energy, the I.R.S. and more — was cut from more than 5 percent of gross domestic product at the end of the 1970s to around half of that today. With the budget caps enacted in the August agreement, domestic discretionary spending would decline to less than 2 percent of G.D.P. by the end of the decade, according to the White House. Government would die by fiscal asphyxiation.

Both parties have joined in crippling the government in response to the demands of their wealthy campaign contributors, who above all else insist on keeping low tax rates on capital gains, top incomes, estates and corporate profits. Corporate taxes as a share of national income are at the lowest levels in recent history. Rich households take home the greatest share of income since the Great Depression. Twice before in American history, powerful corporate interests dominated Washington and brought America to a state of unacceptable inequality, instability and corruption. Both times a social and political movement arose to restore democracy and shared prosperity.

Read more →

November 22nd
12:20 PM
Via

Internet General Assemblies Launched

99anon:

Occupy Assembly:
Facebook page
Website
Document

SuperAssembly:
Counter-proposal to the Internet GA

OpenAssembly:
Website

November 19th
8:11 PM
Via

Lobbyist with ties to the Financial Industry proposed an $850,000+ plan to take on Occupy Wall Street

occupyallstreets:

CLGC’s memo proposes that the ABA pay CLGC $850,000 to conduct “opposition research” on Occupy Wall Street in order to construct “negative narratives” about the protests and allied politicians. 

The memo also asserts that Democratic victories in 2012 would be detrimental for Wall Street and targets specific races in which it says Wall Street would benefit by electing Republicans instead.

According to the memo, if Democrats embrace OWS, “This would mean more than just short-term political discomfort for Wall Street. … It has the potential to have very long-lasting political, policy and financial impacts on the companies in the center of the bullseye.”

The CLGC memo raises another issue that it says should be of concern to the financial industry — that OWS might find common cause with the Tea Party. >continue<   |   >Leaked Memo<

2:22 PM
Via
amazingatheist:

This’ll teach you to sit here peacefully! 

amazingatheist:

This’ll teach you to sit here peacefully! 

November 18th
1:36 PM
Via
thedailywhat:

Police State Photo of the Day: In this striking photo by longtime Oregonian staff photographer Randy L. Rasmussen, an Occupy Portland protester gets a faceful of Mace during yesterday’s local Day of Action demonstration at Pioneer Courthouse Square.
Compare With: Joshua Trujillo’s now-iconic photo of 84-year-old Seattleite Dorli Rainey following a similar encounter with the nozzle end of a pepper spray can.
[oregonian.]

thedailywhat:

Police State Photo of the Day: In this striking photo by longtime Oregonian staff photographer Randy L. Rasmussen, an Occupy Portland protester gets a faceful of Mace during yesterday’s local Day of Action demonstration at Pioneer Courthouse Square.

Compare With: Joshua Trujillo’s now-iconic photo of 84-year-old Seattleite Dorli Rainey following a similar encounter with the nozzle end of a pepper spray can.

[oregonian.]

November 16th
12:26 PM
Via
randomactsofchaos:

Clay Bennett/Chattanooga Times Free Press (11/16/2011)

randomactsofchaos:

Clay Bennett/Chattanooga Times Free Press (11/16/2011)