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July 6th
3:13 PM
"It’s a little bit as though the Grand Wizard of the Ku Klux Klan declared himself the Holy Roman Emperor"
—  Juan Cole, discussing ISIS
March 27th
6:22 PM
It’s Not Twitter It’s The Eclipse Of Reason

An “eclipse of reason” is the current state of the Turkish government. It is not possible to articulate a rational explanation for the new regulations, including the new Internet laws, and their enforcement within a framework of governance informed by basic democratic values. We can only regard these intrusive interventions as acts of despair and a lack of intellect.  >continue<

Tweeps Fight Erdogan with Memes  |  Erdogan’s Mission Impossible
Alevizing Gezi  |  Turkey Media Roundup
_______________ background ______________
Madness on the Bosphorus  |  Scandal threatens Erdogan
Sultan of Istancool  |  Social Media Menace grips Turkey
>more<

It’s Not Twitter It’s The Eclipse Of Reason

An “eclipse of reason” is the current state of the Turkish government. It is not possible to articulate a rational explanation for the new regulations, including the new Internet laws, and their enforcement within a framework of governance informed by basic democratic values. We can only regard these intrusive interventions as acts of despair and a lack of intellect.  >continue<

Tweeps Fight Erdogan with Memes  |  Erdogan’s Mission Impossible

Alevizing Gezi  |  Turkey Media Roundup

_______________ background ______________

Madness on the Bosphorus  |  Scandal threatens Erdogan

Sultan of Istancool  |  Social Media Menace grips Turkey

>more<

August 8th
1:13 PM
Observers see Turkish Show Trial in Ergenekon Verdicts 

When it began in 2008, Turkey&#8217;s trial of the so-called &#8220;Ergenekon&#8221; network of alleged ultra-nationalist conspirators plotting to military coup with assassinations and murders won praise as an important move to curtail the military and strengthen the rule of law.
But by the time it finished on Monday, the trial had been discredited because the prosecution failed to present irrefutable evidence and because of ever new waves of arrests &#8212; not just of military members but of opposition parliamentarians, journalists and academics as well&#8230;
"The once-powerful Kemalist elite had a compliant judiciary. It once sent the current prime minister to jail for reciting a poem. Today Erdogan too has a compliant judiciary which is waging a campaign of revenge against its predecessors."  &gt;continue&lt;

related: 'Tragicomic' Accusations  |  Retaliation over Gezi Park
Turkey&#8217;s Telekinetic Threat  |  A take from 2011

Observers see Turkish Show Trial in Ergenekon Verdicts 

When it began in 2008, Turkey’s trial of the so-called “Ergenekon” network of alleged ultra-nationalist conspirators plotting to military coup with assassinations and murders won praise as an important move to curtail the military and strengthen the rule of law.

But by the time it finished on Monday, the trial had been discredited because the prosecution failed to present irrefutable evidence and because of ever new waves of arrests — not just of military members but of opposition parliamentarians, journalists and academics as well…

"The once-powerful Kemalist elite had a compliant judiciary. It once sent the current prime minister to jail for reciting a poem. Today Erdogan too has a compliant judiciary which is waging a campaign of revenge against its predecessors."  >continue<

related: 'Tragicomic' Accusations  |  Retaliation over Gezi Park

Turkey’s Telekinetic Threat  |  A take from 2011

July 23rd
3:47 PM
Oezlem Gezer and Maximilian Popp  |  Der Spiegel&#160;&#187;

Following mass anti-government protests in Turkey, Ankara is now taking revenge on its critics. Activists and demonstrators are being investigated and intimidated, while journalists are getting fired and insubordinate civil servants transferred far afield.
&#8230;&#8221;In Istanbul, my friends are being arrested and chased through the narrow streets with tear gas,&#8221; says Kahraman. &#8220;And I&#8217;m stuck here.&#8221; But he risks losing his job if he objects to the transfer. He is also receiving death threats, probably from supporters of Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan. He scrolls through the emails on his Blackberry, which include hate-filled Twitter messages. One person wrote: &#8220;We want to see you hanging on Taksim Square.&#8221; In Istanbul, he didn&#8217;t go home for weeks. He changed hotels four times, or slept in offices and friends&#8217; apartments &#8212; when he could sleep at all&#8230;
Conservative journalist Yigit Bulut is already firing up the Turks for a &#8220;war&#8221; and has said that he would &#8220;die for Erdogan.&#8221; Bulut claims that the German and British governments are behind the protests, and that they aim to weaken Turkey. &#8220;But the Turkish people will win this war.&#8221; Prime Minister Erdogan seems to share these views. He has since appointed Bulut to be his chief advisor.  &gt;continue&lt;

Oezlem Gezer and Maximilian Popp  |  Der Spiegel »

Following mass anti-government protests in Turkey, Ankara is now taking revenge on its critics. Activists and demonstrators are being investigated and intimidated, while journalists are getting fired and insubordinate civil servants transferred far afield.

…”In Istanbul, my friends are being arrested and chased through the narrow streets with tear gas,” says Kahraman. “And I’m stuck here.” But he risks losing his job if he objects to the transfer. He is also receiving death threats, probably from supporters of Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan. He scrolls through the emails on his Blackberry, which include hate-filled Twitter messages. One person wrote: “We want to see you hanging on Taksim Square.” In Istanbul, he didn’t go home for weeks. He changed hotels four times, or slept in offices and friends’ apartments — when he could sleep at all…

Conservative journalist Yigit Bulut is already firing up the Turks for a “war” and has said that he would “die for Erdogan.” Bulut claims that the German and British governments are behind the protests, and that they aim to weaken Turkey. “But the Turkish people will win this war.” Prime Minister Erdogan seems to share these views. He has since appointed Bulut to be his chief advisor.  >continue<

July 12th
7:27 AM
Occupy Gezi as Politics of the Body
Zeynep Gambetti  |  Jadaliyya&#160;&#187;

Since the Gezi resistance started with bloodshed on 31 May, it has had an “anti-depressant” effect, as a friend of mine puts it, as much as it has been nerve-racking. During this period where each day has been prone to new crises and normalcy was completely disrupted, we simultaneously experienced the peaks of ecstasy and the depths of sorrow.
&#8230;Each morning, many bodies with sleep deprived eyes wake up in Istanbul, Ankara, Antakya, Urfa, and Denizli to take to the streets once again, after having quickly checked the latest news in the social media. They are astonished and impressed that they can still walk, run, stand up, and carry provisions for those in the parks. Exhausted bodies rejuvenate with every new threat that the government utters.
&#8230;Life, on the other hand, is a constant flux. It challenges borders and moves beyond them. It opens up to circulation those spaces that are closed off due to construction; it paints such destructive vehicles as bulldozers pink; it transforms steps into tribunes&#8230; It plays with identities and definitions; it makes them fluid; it renders them indistinguishable.
&#8230;What comes out of all this is trust, not chaos. That&#8217;s why the bodies multiply with every gush of tear gas, spaces expand with every police attack, and the quality of contact among the bodies increases with every propaganda speech. The life woven together by bodies born in Gezi is so tenacious that the government is right in fearing it. The power of these bodies stems from their capacity to mutualize endurance, rather than vulnerability&#8230; &gt;continue&lt;

"The performer is no longer producing or reproducing the sonata: he feels himself, and the others feel him to be at the service of the sonata; the sonata sings through him or cries out suddenly that he must "dash on his bow" to follow it."
- Merleau-Ponty, The Visible and the Invisible

Occupy Gezi as Politics of the Body

Zeynep Gambetti  |  Jadaliyya »

Since the Gezi resistance started with bloodshed on 31 May, it has had an “anti-depressant” effect, as a friend of mine puts it, as much as it has been nerve-racking. During this period where each day has been prone to new crises and normalcy was completely disrupted, we simultaneously experienced the peaks of ecstasy and the depths of sorrow.

…Each morning, many bodies with sleep deprived eyes wake up in Istanbul, Ankara, Antakya, Urfa, and Denizli to take to the streets once again, after having quickly checked the latest news in the social media. They are astonished and impressed that they can still walk, run, stand up, and carry provisions for those in the parks. Exhausted bodies rejuvenate with every new threat that the government utters.

…Life, on the other hand, is a constant flux. It challenges borders and moves beyond them. It opens up to circulation those spaces that are closed off due to construction; it paints such destructive vehicles as bulldozers pink; it transforms steps into tribunes… It plays with identities and definitions; it makes them fluid; it renders them indistinguishable.

…What comes out of all this is trust, not chaos. That’s why the bodies multiply with every gush of tear gas, spaces expand with every police attack, and the quality of contact among the bodies increases with every propaganda speech. The life woven together by bodies born in Gezi is so tenacious that the government is right in fearing it. The power of these bodies stems from their capacity to mutualize endurance, rather than vulnerability… >continue<

"The performer is no longer producing or reproducing the sonata: he feels himself, and the others feel him to be at the service of the sonata; the sonata sings through him or cries out suddenly that he must "dash on his bow" to follow it."

- Merleau-Ponty, The Visible and the Invisible

July 7th
2:14 PM
Via
occupygezipics:

A riot vehicle in Kadikoy surrounded by protesting masses (7/7/2013)

occupygezipics:

A riot vehicle in Kadikoy surrounded by protesting masses (7/7/2013)

June 3rd
11:55 PM
Via

Taking Stock in Turkey

fickenscher:

…For the last 10 months, this nation has been so peaceful. This whole thing caught me by surprise. Yea, I have seen my fellow students march against Mr. Erdoğan’s goose stepping goons on campus before, but it was different. Before, it was just young idealists, searching for the perfect society in the mess between 200 year old books and liberal campus life. They would laugh about it, you would see kids coming back with grins on their faces, yea their skin was burning, but they got to scare Mr. Erdoğan once. I just wrote it off as “being young” and went along with my business.

But tonight was different. They say that 90 percent of all communication in nonverbal, so when I see the faces of the mass of youth here, walking or limping from the white/orange haze of pepper gas (and who knows what else), or when you talk to them, and instead of hearing their words you listen to their inflections and tone you get a sense of why this moment is different… >continue<

3:18 PM
Via
"Right now, of course, there is this curse called Twitter."
June 2nd
7:44 PM
Via
occupygezipics:

In Taksim Square, a woman holds up a sign asking for PM Erdogan to be true to his words.

occupygezipics:

In Taksim Square, a woman holds up a sign asking for PM Erdogan to be true to his words.

1:08 AM
"Our government actively supports the Syrian opposition, and they constantly call for more democratic rights in Syria. But look what they do to those who oppose their own ideas and policies – they try to shut us up with teargas and violence"
May 31st
11:31 AM
Via
occupygezipics:

&#8230;protester holding the ‘Chemical Tayyip [Erdogan]’ sign pepper sprayed at close range.

Teargas, water cannons at Gezi Park  |  Activists defy bulldozers
Can Erdogan in one gesture squander Turkey&#8217;s rising star? Many pointed to Turkey after events in Tunisia and Egypt as a model. 

occupygezipics:

…protester holding the ‘Chemical Tayyip [Erdogan]’ sign pepper sprayed at close range.

Teargas, water cannons at Gezi Park  |  Activists defy bulldozers

Can Erdogan in one gesture squander Turkey’s rising star? Many pointed to Turkey after events in Tunisia and Egypt as a model

March 21st
9:36 AM

Kurd leader calls for ceasefire in Turkey: "No to weapons. Yes to politics"

Aljazeera video report »

Jailed Kurdish rebel leader Abdullah Ocalan has issued a long-awaited cease-fire declaration that would be a major step towards ending a 30-year conflict…

Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan and Ocalan both appear to have staked their political futures on the renewed push to end the 29-year armed campaign for self-rule that has killed about 40,000 people, mostly Kurds.

Al Jazeera’s Zeina Khodr, reporting from Diyarbakir, said Erdogan has made no secret that he was eyeing the presidency.

"He will need to amend the constitution and would like to increase the powers of the president. He can not do that without the support of the Kurdish party, the BDP," she added. 

Erdogan said he was putting his faith in the peace process “even if it costs me my political career”, in the face of accusations that Ankara was making concessions to Ocalan — routinely labelled a “terrorist chief” and “baby-killer” by Turks.

Ocalan — known as “Apo” — has said he wants peace for the greater good of his people.

"Consider Apo dead if this process fails. I am simply out," the burly 64-year-old was quoted as saying in a rare prison meeting with Kurdish lawmakers last month.  >continue<

February 18th
10:30 AM

Turk Constitutional Crucible & Erdogan's Ambition

Reuters »

Ascending to an executive presidency would cement Erdogan’s position as Turkey’s most significant leader since Ataturk, but it will require astute political maneuvering to win support from either Kurdish or nationalist opposition deputies.

"Erdogan’s charisma is both an advantage and a liability. It’s an advantage because he possesses powers of persuasion; it’s a liability because of his over-confidence, his aversion to criticism," said Ihsan Yilmaz, professor of political science at Fatih University in Istanbul.  >continue<

Turkey is undergoing a constitutional redraft with a critical deadline in April. A major revision aims at replacing the parliamentary system with an executive presidency. Current PM Tayyip Erdogan, barred from repeating the as prime minister under the current system, eyes the new post. Turkey, under Erdogon and his foreign minister Davutoglu, has become a major player in the region - both economically and diplomatically, significantly impacting affairs vis a vis Syria, Iran, Iraq and the unfolding Arab Spring. 

related: The Sultan of Istancool  |  Triumphant Turkey?

October 29th
6:40 PM

A Kurdish Wedge Between Iraq, Turkey

Joost Hiltermann  |  ICG »

Although Ankara has long supported Iraq’s territorial unity as a barrier against Iranian influence and as a check against secessionist impulses among its own Kurdish population, the government of Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan has recently begun to shift strategies. Since 2008, it has forged a close economic bond with the KRG by opening its border and encouraging Turkish investments in the Kurdish region, and its relations with Baghdad have deteriorated…  >continue<