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April 25th
5:06 PM
Via
What Was the South African Military Doing in the Central African Republic?
vicemag »

African politics is a weird mixture of ancient tribal mentalities and democratic ideals imported from the West. It’s proven to be a pretty volatile combination on the continent and one that spurs much of its political strife. One country that’s had to deal with the consequences of that unique approach to governance recently is the landlocked Central African Republic (CAR), home to a violent upheaval that’s been going on since late last year.
In January 2013, South Africa’s ruling ANC party sent 400 troops to the CAR. Ostensibly, they were there to help the country’s president, Francois Bozizé, fight Séléka, the coalition of rebel groups revolting against Bozizé and his government (they allege that Bozizé isn’t honoring peace agreements made after the 2004-2007Central African Republic Bush War). The thing is, the Central African Republic had been suspended from the African Union because of the uprising, which—in theory—should have disqualified them from receiving external military aid.
There is much speculation over why South African President Jacob Zuma deployed his forces to support the CAR’s clearly failing and dictatorial government. The theory picking up the most steam is that both the ANC and a number of its individual members have private mineral and natural resource interests in the CARthat they wish to protect. There are many South African companies exploiting the oil the CAR has to offer, with most of them linked to powerful political figures in South Africa and arguably fueling the coffers that drive the ANC’s political machine.
One such company is DIG Oil, a company prospecting in the southeast of the CAR. Zuma’s nephew sits on the board of DIG Oil—something that suggests Zuma might have more than a passing business interest in the company. It also suggests—if you’re a fan of linking pretty blatant points—that Zuma may well be using the South African military as a private security service to protect his and his cronies’ international business interests.
Continue

What Was the South African Military Doing in the Central African Republic?

vicemag »

African politics is a weird mixture of ancient tribal mentalities and democratic ideals imported from the West. It’s proven to be a pretty volatile combination on the continent and one that spurs much of its political strife. One country that’s had to deal with the consequences of that unique approach to governance recently is the landlocked Central African Republic (CAR), home to a violent upheaval that’s been going on since late last year.

In January 2013, South Africa’s ruling ANC party sent 400 troops to the CAR. Ostensibly, they were there to help the country’s president, Francois Bozizé, fight Séléka, the coalition of rebel groups revolting against Bozizé and his government (they allege that Bozizé isn’t honoring peace agreements made after the 2004-2007Central African Republic Bush War). The thing is, the Central African Republic had been suspended from the African Union because of the uprising, which—in theory—should have disqualified them from receiving external military aid.

There is much speculation over why South African President Jacob Zuma deployed his forces to support the CAR’s clearly failing and dictatorial government. The theory picking up the most steam is that both the ANC and a number of its individual members have private mineral and natural resource interests in the CARthat they wish to protect. There are many South African companies exploiting the oil the CAR has to offer, with most of them linked to powerful political figures in South Africa and arguably fueling the coffers that drive the ANC’s political machine.

One such company is DIG Oil, a company prospecting in the southeast of the CAR. Zuma’s nephew sits on the board of DIG Oil—something that suggests Zuma might have more than a passing business interest in the company. It also suggests—if you’re a fan of linking pretty blatant points—that Zuma may well be using the South African military as a private security service to protect his and his cronies’ international business interests.

Continue

February 18th
10:37 AM
Via
thesmithian:


Mamphela Ramphele, a respected veteran of the struggle against apartheid, announced on Monday that she had formed a new political party to challenge the governing African National Congress, calling on South Africans to “join me on a journey to build the country of our dreams.” The party will be called Agang, meaning “build,” said Dr. Ramphele, a physician who became an anti-apartheid activist…The new party is the latest in a string of challengers to the dominance of the A.N.C., which has won every national election since apartheid ended in 1994 but has come under increasing scrutiny over charges of corruption and poor governance. In addition, inequality has grown in South Africa since the end of apartheid…

more

thesmithian:

Mamphela Ramphele, a respected veteran of the struggle against apartheid, announced on Monday that she had formed a new political party to challenge the governing African National Congress, calling on South Africans to “join me on a journey to build the country of our dreams.” The party will be called Agang, meaning “build,” said Dr. Ramphele, a physician who became an anti-apartheid activist…The new party is the latest in a string of challengers to the dominance of the A.N.C., which has won every national election since apartheid ended in 1994 but has come under increasing scrutiny over charges of corruption and poor governance. In addition, inequality has grown in South Africa since the end of apartheid…

more

January 31st
1:09 PM
Via
globalvoices:

South Africa’s Democratic Alliance Students Organisation recently released a controversial poster as part of their anti-racism campaign, which shows a naked mixed-race couple embracing.
The caption reads: “In OUR future, you wouldn’t look twice”

globalvoices:

South Africa’s Democratic Alliance Students Organisation recently released a controversial poster as part of their anti-racism campaign, which shows a naked mixed-race couple embracing.

The caption reads: “In OUR future, you wouldn’t look twice”

November 10th
9:28 AM
Julius Malema suspended from ANC for 5 years

The ruling has prompted intense speculation that Mr Malema could set up a splinter party in a bid to unseat his former friend and now arch enemy Jacob Zuma from power.

He has some powerful backers within the ANC - among them millionaire housing minister and businessman Tokyo Sexwale and Mr Mandela’s former wife Winnie Madikizela-Mandela, who remains an MP. >continue<

close up: Julius Malema: A Special Report  |  Zuma Rival Sackedphoto: Alexander Joe/AFP/Getty Images

Julius Malema suspended from ANC for 5 years

The ruling has prompted intense speculation that Mr Malema could set up a splinter party in a bid to unseat his former friend and now arch enemy Jacob Zuma from power.

He has some powerful backers within the ANC - among them millionaire housing minister and businessman Tokyo Sexwale and Mr Mandela’s former wife Winnie Madikizela-Mandela, who remains an MP. >continue<

close up: Julius Malema: A Special Report  |  Zuma Rival Sacked
photo: Alexander Joe/AFP/Getty Images

August 31st
5:37 PM
Zuma &amp; ANC face critical test in South Africa

Officials said on Tuesday night that the hearing, which could suspend Julius Malema from the ANC, would be moved to an undisclosed location after clashes between riot police and Malema supporters outside the headquarters.Police used water cannon and stun grenades against pro-Malema crowds, who burned ANC flags and posters of South African president Jacob Zuma.  &gt;continue&lt;

After recent elections that saw the rival Democratic Alliance surge from 14 to 22 percent, The African National Congress (ANC) sees an acute controversy brewing over disciplinary proceedings and the head of the party&#8217;s youth wing, Julius Malema. The drama here could portend a significant rift in the ANC, which has ruled South Africa since the end of apartheid.
Julius Malema: A Special Report  |  Malema faces expulsion threat
photo: Werner Beukes, Sapa

Zuma & ANC face critical test in South Africa

Officials said on Tuesday night that the hearing, which could suspend Julius Malema from the ANC, would be moved to an undisclosed location after clashes between riot police and Malema supporters outside the headquarters.

Police used water cannon and stun grenades against pro-Malema crowds, who burned ANC flags and posters of South African president Jacob Zuma.  >continue<

After recent elections that saw the rival Democratic Alliance surge from 14 to 22 percent, The African National Congress (ANC) sees an acute controversy brewing over disciplinary proceedings and the head of the party’s youth wing, Julius Malema. The drama here could portend a significant rift in the ANC, which has ruled South Africa since the end of apartheid.

Julius Malema: A Special Report  |  Malema faces expulsion threat

photo: Werner Beukes, Sapa

August 19th
3:21 PM

Julius Malema faces ANC expulsion threat

Fears outspoken South African youth leader could dent Jacob Zuma’s presidential re-election bid after call for Botswana coup

Julius Malema, arguably the most colourful and divisive figure in South African politics, was charged with bringing the ANC into disrepute after calling for the overthrow of the democratically-elected government of neighbouring Botswana.

… "It’s about December 2012 when the party goes to the next leadership conference and Zuma knows he has to control Malema if he is to comfortably secure himself a second term."

The DA having "cracked the white ceiling" in recent elections, this apparent threat to the stability of the ANC may deserve on-going scrutiny.

May 17th
9:17 AM
Via
csmonitor:

Photo: Supporters of the ruling African National Congress rally outside a Cape Town courthouse ahead of the May 18 ballot. 
 
Since South Africa’s black majority finally won their freedom from the white apartheid regime 17 years ago, most blacks have voted reliably for the African National Congress (ANC). But ahead of Wednesday’s municipal elections, voters in a number of poor black townships say they may ditch the once-vaunted party of anti-apartheid icon Nelson Mandela – even if that means voting for the white-run Democratic Alliance (DA).

ANC &#8216;Stranglehold&#8217; Weakening |  Zuma set for embarrassment
DA for the win: On Twitter  | Zuma makes case

csmonitor:

Photo: Supporters of the ruling African National Congress rally outside a Cape Town courthouse ahead of the May 18 ballot. 

Since South Africa’s black majority finally won their freedom from the white apartheid regime 17 years ago, most blacks have voted reliably for the African National Congress (ANC). But ahead of Wednesday’s municipal elections, voters in a number of poor black townships say they may ditch the once-vaunted party of anti-apartheid icon Nelson Mandela – even if that means voting for the white-run Democratic Alliance (DA).

ANC ‘Stranglehold’ Weakening |  Zuma set for embarrassment

DA for the win: On Twitter  | Zuma makes case