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April 7th
1:36 AM
Iran’s Blue-Collar Revolution

[the working class] have historically made up a significant portion of Ahmadinejad’s base. Their loyalty cemented with generous government largesse, they mostly stayed on the side of the president after the contested June 2009 election, when thousands of protesters took to the streets to denounce the results. Those discontents called themselves the Green Movement, drawn primarily from the ranks of the middle class, intelligentsia, and students. The underclass, still loyal to the regime and Ahmadinejad, became known as the Blues
… As its leaders understand, the Green Movement’s future hinges crucially on its ability to make common cause with the Blues. The continued deterioration of the economy creates that opportunity  >read more<

Though the “The Blues are going Green” argument may be cause for hope, perhaps causing existential angst among the Basij “enforcers”, there may also be reason for dread. The crisis in Bahrain - featuring Saudi aid in the brutal marginalization of the 70% Shia majority - could provide a useful pretext for Iranian brinkmanship in the Gulf.  It wouldn’t be the first time domestic political woes enticed leaders into working national aspirations toward an external focus.

Iran’s Blue-Collar Revolution

[the working class] have historically made up a significant portion of Ahmadinejad’s base. Their loyalty cemented with generous government largesse, they mostly stayed on the side of the president after the contested June 2009 election, when thousands of protesters took to the streets to denounce the results. Those discontents called themselves the Green Movement, drawn primarily from the ranks of the middle class, intelligentsia, and students. The underclass, still loyal to the regime and Ahmadinejad, became known as the Blues

… As its leaders understand, the Green Movement’s future hinges crucially on its ability to make common cause with the Blues. The continued deterioration of the economy creates that opportunity  >read more<

Though the “The Blues are going Green” argument may be cause for hope, perhaps causing existential angst among the Basij “enforcers”, there may also be reason for dread. The crisis in Bahrain - featuring Saudi aid in the brutal marginalization of the 70% Shia majority - could provide a useful pretext for Iranian brinkmanship in the Gulf.  It wouldn’t be the first time domestic political woes enticed leaders into working national aspirations toward an external focus.

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