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December 14th
10:31 AM
Egypt undergoes round 2 of elections today after initial strong showings by the Muslim Brotherhood and the Salafis.  For Copts, Sufis, and the revolutionary youth,  a new Egypt in sync with their aspirations may well be a task more difficult than bringing down Mubarak.


What the Salfists Want
The Salafists’ strong showing hasn’t just shocked many Egyptians, but especially the country’s revolutionary youth, liberals and leftists, Coptic Christians and moderate Muslims. It was, after all, the Salafists who had agitated against the Copts and boycotted the revolution, on the grounds that it was infiltrated with “whores and Zionists.” And it was also the Salafists who, until now, had rejected free elections as “un-Islamic.” And now they are coming into power as democrats?
The Al-Nour Party was formed in the spring as a melting pot of various conservative and formerly militant groups. Its members were not exactly known for their democratic ambitions, but rather for their close ties to the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Since the establishment of the “Party of Light,” more than $100 million (€75 million) in campaign funds have allegedly made their way from the oil-rich, Wahhabite kingdom to the banks of the Nile.  >continue<


Salafis: Why the Surprise?  |  Sufi vs. Salafist
Sufi Counterbalance?  |  'Post Islamist' Potential?
Copts face bleak future  |  Attacks on Sufis  |  Manichean Paradigm?


"To the Sufi, perhaps the greatest absurdity in life is the way in which people strive for things — such as knowledge — without the basic equipment for acquiring them. They have assumed that all they need is “two eyes and a mouth,” as Nasrudin says. In Sufism, a person cannot learn until he is in a state in which he can perceive what he is learning”

Egypt undergoes round 2 of elections today after initial strong showings by the Muslim Brotherhood and the Salafis.  For Copts, Sufis, and the revolutionary youth,  a new Egypt in sync with their aspirations may well be a task more difficult than bringing down Mubarak.

What the Salfists Want

The Salafists’ strong showing hasn’t just shocked many Egyptians, but especially the country’s revolutionary youth, liberals and leftists, Coptic Christians and moderate Muslims. It was, after all, the Salafists who had agitated against the Copts and boycotted the revolution, on the grounds that it was infiltrated with “whores and Zionists.” And it was also the Salafists who, until now, had rejected free elections as “un-Islamic.” And now they are coming into power as democrats?

The Al-Nour Party was formed in the spring as a melting pot of various conservative and formerly militant groups. Its members were not exactly known for their democratic ambitions, but rather for their close ties to the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Since the establishment of the “Party of Light,” more than $100 million (€75 million) in campaign funds have allegedly made their way from the oil-rich, Wahhabite kingdom to the banks of the Nile.  >continue<

Salafis: Why the Surprise?  |  Sufi vs. Salafist

Sufi Counterbalance? 'Post Islamist' Potential?

Copts face bleak future  |  Attacks on Sufis  |  Manichean Paradigm?

"To the Sufi, perhaps the greatest absurdity in life is the way in which people strive for things — such as knowledge — without the basic equipment for acquiring them. They have assumed that all they need is “two eyes and a mouth,” as Nasrudin says. In Sufism, a person cannot learn until he is in a state in which he can perceive what he is learning”

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